My new work in David Horvitz’ Cigarette beetle

Two pages from my new work was sent to over 30 museums around the world, unsolicited, as part of David Horvitz’s project Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) this summer. David filled archival boxes with 30 copies of a group show of print artworks and mailed them to museums around the world. My contribution is below.

Lasioderma-Serricorne-for-chimps

table-of-contents-october-proof_small

Can you see where this is going? More soon!

Other artists in the project are Marley Freeman, Sena Başöz, Lukas Geronimas, Sara Magenheimer, Ed Steck, Michael Bell-Smith, Duane Linklater, Jamie Chan, Zach Houston, Jamie Stewart, Ann Böttcher, Julia Weist, Anne Lai, R. Lyon, Mia Nolting, Karen Adelman, Denise Schatz and Natalie Beall, Amalia Ulman, Sydney Kim, Michael Bühler-Rose, Siriol Joyner, Leif Hedendal, Vanessa Safavi, Kristina Lee Podesva, Mary Walling Blackburn, Taeyoon Choi. 

Fake It! (Limited Edition) at Fabrica de Pensule

Fake It! (Limited Edition) at Fabrica de Pensule

AfterSherrieLevine is included in Fake It! (Limited Edition), an exhibition at Fabrica de Pensule in Cluj Romania, curated by Horea Avram. They are including a computer with a printing and framing station, so you can print out, sign and frame your own image from the site.

From Avram’s curatorial statement:

The “sources” to which the works of this exhibition make reference are appropriated, diverted, plagiarized, or parodied with various visual and tactical means: from video to object, to photography, performance and online intervention. In this sense, the idea of fake is seen not only as a working instrument confined to the art field but one that addresses directly the larger context of culture, society and politics. Therefore, the imperative of the title points precisely to the evident actuality and implicit diversity of such a theme.

The exhibition runs from October 5th through November 20th, 2012.

Art, Environment, Action! – Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons

The Social Media Reader in the wild

As part of Art, Environment, Action! at Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons, I will be giving a 3 day workshop on making visual contributions to Wikipedia. Building on the work of Wikipedia Illustrated and others, the goal will be to use visual language to explain complex concepts without over simplifying them. This could range from the factual, such as diagrams of biological or chemical phenomena, maps of environmental issues/disasters, or charts, to the poetic or expressive. Artists, scientists, illustrators, environmental historians, designers, activists, and Wikipedians are invited to this collaborative workshop. No knowledge of Wikipedia editing is required. Participants should bring relevant materials, including but not limited to computers, sketchbooks, and thinking caps.

For more info, or to register, please visit the workshop page.

Art, Environment, Action! is a creative laboratory that brings together 16 internationally renowned artists/artist collectives and designers to explore art as, and in, environmental action. Over 11 weeks, the gallery will function as an active learning environment and a lively locus of exchange on ecological issues through movement, media, visual and performance art, and design.

Participating artists include: Beehive Design Collective; Stefani Bardin, Toby Heys, and Siddharth Ramakrishnan; Beatriz da Costa; Ecoarttech; Futurefarmers; Michael Mandiberg; Jennifer Monson/iLAND; Beverly Naidus; Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science; Red 76; Stephanie Rothenberg; Jill Sigman; Trade School; and Tattfoo Tan.

Downloadable exhibition organized by David Horvitz

roses-for-horvitz-left-300 roses-for-horvitz-right-300

I am in a downloadable group exhibition entitled “you and I may not hurry it with a thousand poems my darling but nobody will stop it With all the Policemen in The World.zip.” Released June 1st, the exhibition is a bouquet of spring flowers to broadcast far and wide.

This exhibition may be freely downloaded, printed, exhibited, published, copied, etc… from this link: http://www.sendspace.com/file/qxr6bo . There are no installation instructions. The recommended print sizes are listed in the works list PDF. The zipped folder will will remain available as long as the sendspace link is active. They will not be re-uploaded.

With: Anjum Asharia and Marisa Jahn, BFFA3AE, Claudia Sola, David Horvitz, Hans Aarsman, Jon Rafman, Kristina Lee Podesva, Marysia Lewandowska, Michael Mandiberg, Mishka Henner, Natalie Häusler, Vlatka Horvat

Oil Standard in The Oil Show at HMKV

Oil Standard in The Oil Show at HMKV

In The Oil Show the HMKV has gathered 15 contemporary artists whose work addresses the geopolitical, social and ecological consequences of our dependence on crude oil.

Identities Precaires

Identities Precaires

Une exposition collective sur la question de l’anonymat et de l’identité comme phénomène instable

Image Wars at Abrons Art Center

Image Wars at Abrons Art Center

The Abrons Arts Center is proud to present Image Wars, an exhibition that addresses the representation of conflict in visual culture in an age of global crisis.

In Light of Recent Events during Art Basel, Miami Beach

In Light of Recent Events
An exhibition of necessary research
during Art Basel, Miami Beach

Curated by SPECTREVISION
Wynwood Arts District, December 2-5, 2010
Lions Gallery @ Museovault
346 NW 29th Street, Miami, FL 33127

Showcasing contemporary work inspired by current events. In navigating the borderlands of investigative practice, spectre long ago abandoned the catalogue notion of “genre”; as such spectrevision humbly presents studio art work juxtaposed interchangeably with experiments and efforts that defy current modes of categorization, displayed alongside research materials and other relevant findings.

Featuring:
Jeremy Dean, Jonathon Keats, Abigail Portner, Oliver Laric, Judi Werthein, Julieta Aranda, Michael Mandiberg, Iris Lasn, Nellie Appleby, Mike Ross, hacker Dan Kaminsky, authors Stephen Mihm (“Nation of Counterfeiters”), Howard Bloom (“Lucifer Principle”), Robert Eisenberg (“Boychicks in the Hood”), & Zachary Mexico (“China Underground”), Philip Tinari (founding editor artforum.com.cn & LEAP), photographers Cheryl Dunn, Tod Seelie, Jamel Toppin, Janine Gordon, Stacy Kranitz, Olivia Wyatt, & Julia Solis, Miami firefighter Myles Kaplan, holographer Mark Diamond, psychic economist Eva Destruction, artist/activist Ben Sisto, ‘missed connections’ curator Gillian Sneed, consumer advocate Dewey LLC, and others.

“the future is not what it used to be” at Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw, Poland

the future is not what it used to be, CCA Warsaw Poland

An exhibition curated by Magdalena Sawon
10.11.2010 – 26.12.2010

Tamas Banovich
Kevin Bewersdorf
Mikolaj Dlugosz
Ursula Endlicher
Zach Gage
Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung
Kobas Laksa
Michael Mandiberg
Eva and Franco Mattes (aka 0100101110101101.org)
Joe McKay
JooYoun Paek
The Yes Men

Art has always been a transformative reflection of reality and a moment in time. It is 2010. The screen is the window and the web is the tool to experience and engage in the world. Google, Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, Chatroulette, YouTube, Second Life and ebay are not virtual, they are real.

“the future is not what it used to be” brings together artists engaged in the Internet shaped culture. Through photographs, sculpture, video, and online projects they explore new tenets of social interaction in a networked world.

Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? – the grand troika of Paul Gauguin’s questions about existential doubt and one’s consciousness is always relevant, but this very moment, loaded with radical changes taking place, also calls for specific inquiries: How do new communication tools and smart technologies affect cultural and sociopolitical realm? What happens to contemplation in the times of speed? What are sustainable strategies for contemporary life? How does one navigate between connectivity and dis-connect, instantaneity and rapid obsolescence, and digital/analog divide. How does the Internet – the largest image depository and the largest data base ever – affects new forms of appropriation, means of production and delivery, and modes of political engagement?

The future may only bring more questions. Einstein said “I never think of the future. It comes soon enough” This may be true, but – back to Gauguin – who we are and what we do today shapes our tomorrows.

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*The title of this show is a quote from Paul Valery (1871-1945)

No Customs – SAMA Tower, Abu Dhabi

No Customs - SAMA Tower, Abu Dhabi

No Customs
SAMA Tower, Abu Dhabi
November 4-27, 2010
opening reception: Thursday Nov  4,  7-9 pm
curated by Jennifer and Kevin McCoy
an exhibition of transmissible ideas with:

Vito Acconci, Jason Robert Bell & Marni Kotak, Torsten Z. Burns, Jennifer Dalton & Susan Hamburger, Anthony Discenza, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron Davidson, Bill Durgin, Tara Fracalossi, David Grubbs, Sara Hubbs, Thomas Lail, Michael Mandiberg, MTAA, Marisa Olson, Jonathan Schipper, Mark Tribe, Karen Yasinsky

A common art-making strategy when one enters into new territory is to listen, to ask, and to wait. As newcomers to Abu Dhabi, we considered this strategy, but then rejected it.  Instead of waiting to receive information, we begin our sojourn in the Emirates by making an offer.  In curating this show, No Customs, held in our remarkably gallery like living space, we offer the work of artists connected to us from our home community of New York City.  When they asked what life is like here, we answered we didn’t yet know.  We told them to send what they could send via email, via instructions, via concept. We told them to send it fast.  So then, what we have is a show called No Customs. This title is a double entendre. Practically, since no objects have been mailed, we were not slowed by the expense of shipping and the delays of customs.  Metaphorically, the show is not about tradition or interpretation, but rather about mapping and transcription.   How does form map onto landscape? How does it transform landscape? How do you demarcate space for contemplation, for understanding, for revolution? What happens to the body when its image occupies this demarcated space? – Jennifer and Kevin McCoy